Apple Wants to Patent Auto-Correct Highlighting

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There’s a never-ending stream of patent applications coming out of Cupertino. One that was discovered recently wants to make sure your contacts know when auto-correct intervenes. Apple filed their application last July. It’s entitled “Device, Method, and graphical user interface for visible and interactive corrective content,” and it describes something that sounds like the autocorrect equivalent to underlining typos.

There’s a never-ending stream of patent applications coming out of Cupertino. One that was discovered recently wants to make sure your contacts know when auto-correct intervenes.

Apple filed their application last July. It’s entitled “Device, Method, and graphical user interface for visible and interactive corrective content,” and it describes something that sounds like the autocorrect equivalent to underlining typos.

Whenever auto-correct works its magic on something you type in an iMessage, the corrected text would be highlighted somehow. The patent app covers pretty much all the bases: a change in font, font size, color, italics, bold, and even actual highlighting. In typical patent fashion, Apple goes through 21 exhaustive steps and a truckload of “further comprising” and “wherein” statements to detail what they’re pitching.

It’s also a sort of extension to something they already do in iOS. When you’re dictating a message and their speech recognition system isn’t quite sure what word you said, it’ll underline whatever word it thinks you said in blue. That makes it easier to notice an off-target suggestion before you hit send.

The goal, they say, is to provide users with a better messaging experience. Errant autocorrects can cause a lot of confusion and frustration. If neither you or your recipient knows it was autocorrect that inserted a crucial word or two, schedules, plans, even relationships could be ruined.

Or you might panic, thinking that your co-worker really was being lunch — not that you’re supposed to bring lunch to your meeting. OK, probably not, but you may at least have to send two or three additional messages to clarify things, and that’s wasted time and energy.

Source: geek.com

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